How to Paint a Rottweiler Dog – Cute Puppy Watercolor Tutorial


For this video I’m going to show you how
I drew and painted this head and tail view of a Rottweiler puppy. It was a
special request that I created to sell in a set of two prints for my Etsy
store. So I’ll just walk you through my process for painting this cute little
Rottweiler! Alright guys, I did use some reference photos for this, but as you can
see especially for the hind view of the puppy I did have to do a lot of
designing from imagination. I started by sketching on the front facing puppy
first very loosely and lightly but constantly measuring and checking my
symmetry and then I went back and refined my drawing with a more confident
outline. I drew the rear view puppy the same way
carefully making visual measurements and trying to make the hips the same height
as the first puppy. Animal heads and tails prints are actually trending on
Etsy right now for nursery decor and I did have a specific request from a
customer for a Rottweiler so I just thought I’d make a video out of the
process – I think the heart shape on the rottie’s butt is so cute!
If you want to try this artwork for yourself you can actually download my
sketch as a guide using the link in the description below, although I recommend
just trying to do the drawing yourself. It’s great practice! My paper for this
painting is Arches 140 pound hot pressed paper, 100% cotton size 9 by
12 inches and I just split it down the center with a piece of tape. My paints
are the set of 48 half pans by Senneiler and I used my Princeton Neptune round
brush size eight for most of the painting. Of course I’ll link all of
these in the description. The colors I mostly used for this
were Payne’s gray, black, burnt sienna and yellow ochre. My very first wash of
color is with yellow ochre just blocking in the distinctive yellowish brown
markings in the Rottweilers face, chest, and legs. I darken a little bit around
the mouth with burnt sienna. The tongue is just painted with a light
wash of light blue and then I add the bright pink hints. After that I darken
the inside of the mouth almost to black. I paint the nose using black and Payne’s
gray and a little ultramarine for just a hint of blue. These details are so tiny-
I’m using the finest point of my brush. I use my darkest black to paint the
skinny little underside of the ears and the darkest details of the eyes just
really carefully painting around the highlights. It’s a really quick wash of black on the
head and darken as needed, notably between the eyes, and create furry
definition on the ears. This forward-facing puppy’s face was
certainly the most detailed and time-consuming part to paint. Once the
head was finished I added some burnt sienna to the chest then quickly dropped
in some black allowing it to bleed into the yellow section a little. Hot pressed
paper dries really fast so timing is critical. I make sure my black paint is
just a little bit watered down on the sides of the dog. Burnt sienna lends a
lovely pop of color to the legs and I define the toes just using some black. I add a little watery gray shadow and then
move on to the second painting. The rear view of the puppy only took about 15
minutes because it wasn’t quite as detailed and I could use broader
brushstrokes and just paint quite a bit faster. I painted the yellow ochre
heart-shape first and the toes using a generous amount of water. I want it to
dry slowly enough that I could go in with black and allow the two colors to
bleed. I did let it dry just a little bit first before bringing in the black
because it was pretty wet. With a heavy wet black I paint around the heart letting the edges touch. The bleeding got a little too crazy so I wiped it out with
a clean damp brush and then continued to quickly paint in the black body and legs. I darkened the front legs and added
those same pops of burnt sienna and yellow to the heart shape and toes. You can kind of see I divided the dog
into two sections the head and the neck being the second
section. This way I didn’t have to worry about painting all the black all at once
and running into drying issues and hard edges that might form. I painted the head
and neck very quickly using lots of juicy paint and watering it down where
the fur is shiny. It only needed just a couple of dark touch-ups.
I painted a similar shadow to the first one really trying to make the shape and
size even but not identical with the first dog. When creating a pair of
paintings that are meant to be displayed together it’s very helpful to have them
side by side so that you can constantly check that your proportions match and
that the colors look good together. This was so much fun to paint and a very
welcome break from my usual super realistic style. I hope you enjoyed
today’s video! If you did please be sure to subscribe if you’re new here, hit the
like button, and turn on notifications so you never miss any new videos. I’ll be
posting new videos every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. Thank you so much
for watching!

6 thoughts on “How to Paint a Rottweiler Dog – Cute Puppy Watercolor Tutorial

  • Such a cute puppy! Thanks! ps..I recall you saying in one of your videos that you are self taught and watched a lot of you tube instruction vids to learn watercolor – I do too! Do you have any favorites? You are one of mine now!

  • this was so wonderful and refreshing to watch, i love seeing drawing from the absolute beginning. the rottie is so incredibly sweet , your use of watercolour is wonderful, i absolutely love it , beautifully done😀

  • Hi Emily, your commentary really helps us follow your creative process. You are very skilled at painting with watercolours. Lovely painting! Watched in full, liked (18) and subscribed (958). Perhaps we can connect. Thanks, Marcus

  • Hi Emily , recently discovered your Channel and love it. Your work is beautiful.
    I am having trouble downloading some of you sketch’s ( like this Rottweiler puppy) it opens in another image of mountains, I am doing anything wrong? Or it was a mistake on the posting.??? 😘😘😘😘 looking forward to do this tutorial.

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